Turkey and Potato Curry Pockets


Turkey and Potato Curry Pockets
Author: 
Recipe type: Main dish, Entree, Snack
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Yield: 12 pockets, Serve 2 per person
 
These pockets turn leftover turkey or chicken, mashed potatoes and perhaps even leftover vegetables into a meal you would enjoy even if you had to start from scratch. The curried potato mixture is similar to what you might find in an Indian samosa, but these are baked in a pastry pocket instead of being fried. You can make your own pastry or use the packaged ones you find in the refrigerator case in the supermarket. You can store the unbaked pockets in the freezer for up to 2 months by placing them on a baking sheet and freezing them until they are firm enough to transfer to a freezer-weight plastic bag. Bake the frozen pies at 375°F for 30 to 45 minutes.
Ingredients
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 1 cup onion, diced or chopped finely
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 2 cups mashed potatoes
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1 1/2 cups diced roasted turkey or chicken
  • 3 refrigerated rolled pie crusts
  • 1 egg, beaten
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees °F. Line a baking sheet with a non-stick silicone sheet such as Silpat or parchment paper. Heat the butter in a large non-stick skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, curry powder, salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally until the onion is golden brown and softened. Take off the heat. Add the mashed potatoes, peas and turkey.
  2. Unroll the pie crusts and cut each into 4 quarters. Divide the potato/pea/turkey mixture into 12 portions and place them on the dough, covering one half of each piece of dough. Fold the dough over the filling. Use a fork to press the edges to seal them and leave a decorative edge. Put the pies on the baking sheet. Brush with the beaten egg and bake until golden brown, 15 to 20 minutes.

Thanksgiving Turkey Made Easy

 

Thanksgiving Turkey Made Easy
Author: 
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Yield: 12 to 25 servings
 
All you need to know about defrosting and roasting the perfect turkey for Thanksgiving.
Ingredients
  • Turkey
  • Salt and Pepper
  • Oil
Instructions
  1. The star participant in most American Thanksgiving dinners is the turkey. For me, there were two key discoveries that I made over the years that made Thanksgiving preparations much easier.
  2. The first discovery was what to do with the huge (18-25 pound) frozen turkeys I usually choose when refrigerator space is at a premium. For many, many years I have been purchasing a large frozen turkey four days before I need to cook it. I double-wrap it in store plastic bags. I double-wrap that in store paper bags. This is my first line of defense to keep the turkey insulated. I put it in a large well-insulated plastic cooler and leave it until marathon cooking day. I usually turn it over by the third day, ensure it is still cold enough in the cooler and if it seems like the thawing is getting close to done, I add gel ice packs to keep it under 40 degrees when the top of the cooler is closed. When I am ready to cook the turkey, it is defrosted enough to handle and there is still ice in the bird’s cavity. We have never had a problem with over-temperature birds and all my guests have survived without issues. Before putting the cooler back in storage, we wash it out well with chlorine bleach and water or antiseptic wipes.
  3. The second discovery was the process of spatchcocking a turkey. What was that you say? Spatchcocking, sometimes called butterflying. It is simply the process of cutting out the backbone of the turkey with a pair of poultry shears and the help of a heavy, sharp knife. The turkey is then put on a sheet pan skin side up, and pressure is applied to the breastbones to crack them and flatten the turkey. One Thanksgiving, I was having trouble getting enough leverage to crack the breastbones of a very large turkey. I placed the turkey pan on the floor and got down on my knees to lean on the breast with more of my weight. At that point my sister came into the kitchen, looked at me poised over the turkey with my hands pressing on the breastbone and deadpanned with a doleful look, “I think it’s too late.” Your turkey will not need CPR! If you like, you can remove the wing tips at this point. Season with salt and pepper,
    brush with oil and bake at 450 degrees F until the turkey thigh reaches an internal temperature of 165 degrees F on an
    instant read thermometer
        . A 12 pound turkey will be done in a little over an hour. An 18 pound turkey will probably be done in an hour and forty five minutes. Check for doneness earlier than you think possible! The turkey will be golden brown and both the dark meat and the breast meat will be perfectly cooked in record time. It is magic that you can get moist breast meat and cooked dark meat all at once while freeing up extra oven space for sides because the turkey is not as tall as it would be with a traditional roasting method. Do not attempt to carve the turkey until it has set for at least 15 minutes to allow the juices to distribute through the meat. Carving before the turkey has had a chance to set will cause the juices to end up on your carving board, not in the turkey.


    The turkey pictured here was moved from the roasting sheet pan to this aluminum foil lined pan for photos and so I could work on gravy using the lovely pan juices and browned bits while it set. The position you see it in is the position your unroasted turkey will sit in as you put it in the oven.


    When the turkey had set, I carved it by taking the breast portions off the bones with my fingers and a small knife and cutting them crosswise into slices. The drumsticks and wing portions were left whole. The thigh meat was sliced.